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Park Summaries
Prince Edward Island

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All text and photos are copyrighted by Parks Canada or the Canadian Register of Historic Places (except as noted) and were extracted from either the Parks Canada or Canada's Historic Places Websites. Parks with a grey background are managed by Parks Canada.



©Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 1987
Alberton Court House National Historic Site of Canada
Alberton, Prince Edward Island

The Alberton Court House is a simple wooden hall under a steeply pitched roof. With its entry on a gable end, the building evokes the image of a pioneer church rather than the courthouse that it was. Located in Alberton, Prince Edward Island, it is notable for its Neo-classical composition and graceful proportions.

Alberton Court House was designated a National Historic Site in 1980 because it is both representative and the most ornate of a series of six circuit court houses erected according to a standard plan, soon after the passage of Prince Edward Island's County Courts Act in 1873.

All these early circuit court houses were small single storey pitched roof buildings constructed to a standard plan with a porch/vestibule and an open interior court room. The Alberton Court House was built in 1877-1878 by James Wiggins and Sons of Alberton to the standard plan designed by the Prince Edward Island Superintendent of Public Works in 1874-1875. The basement of the Alberton Court House contained half a dozen cells as well as accommodation for a keeper. The building ceased to be used as a court house in the late 1970s and began to be used as the local museum in 1980.

The heritage value of Alberton Court House National Historic Site lies in those aspects of its design that conform to the standard plan - its single storey form, open interior layout and porch/vestibule - as well as those that mark this building as distinctive - its basement gaol, its Neo-classical composition and graceful proportions.

©Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 1991
All Souls' Chapel National Historic Site of Canada
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island

All Souls Chapel is a small chapel built in the High Victorian Gothic Revival style of rust-red, Prince Edward Island sandstone. It is attached to the side of St. Peter's Anglican Cathedral, a brick Gothic Revival church built in 1867-9. All Souls Chapel is located in Charlottetown's historic downtown, next to Rochford Square Park and the Provincial Government Buildings.

All Souls Chapel was designated a national historic site in 1990 because it is an exceptional example of the High Victorian Gothic Revival Style in Canadian architecture.

All Souls Chapel was designed by the celebrated Island architect William Critchlow Harris as a memorial to the Reverend George Hodgson, the first priest-incumbent of the Cathedral. On the exterior, Harris fashioned a masterful local interpretation of High Victorian Gothic Revival architecture by using roughly textured, rust-red Prince Edward Island sandstone to create the colour and texture demanded of the style. Harris' interior design is representative of the style's capacity to embrace other architectural influences, such as the Romanesque. The eighteen mural paintings that distinguish the interior are by the well-known 19th-century Canadian artist Robert Harris, brother of the architect and painter of the official portrait of the Fathers of Confederation.

©Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, J. Butterill, 1995
Apothecaries Hall National Historic Site of Canada
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island

Apothecaries Hall National Historic Site of Canada is a three-storey brick building in downtown Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. Built as an apothecary in 1900, it replaced an earlier building serving the same purpose. It now houses retail premises on the ground floor and offices on the upper two levels.

Apothecaries Hall was designated a national historic site of Canada because from 1810 to 1986 an apothecary shop was operated on this site, making it one of the oldest continually operated pharmacies in Canada.

The heritage value of this site resides in its historical association with one of Canada's longest operating pharmacies and the building's physical elements that accommodated that function.

©Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 2011
Ardgowan National Historic Site of Canada
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island

Residence of Father of Confederation William Henry Pope, circa 1850.

Ardgowan National Historic Site was once the home of William Henry Pope, one of the Fathers of Confederation from Prince Edward Island. It is an example of a picturesque rural cottage from the Victorian era, and the house and grounds have been restored to the period. Visitors can experience the serenity of the restored Victorian grounds, enjoy a family picnic or take a leisurely stroll. The administrative offices for Parks Canada, Prince Edward Island, are located inside the house.

Ardgowan National Historic Site is a gracious home from the third quarter of the nineteenth century. Located in Charlottetown, Prince Edward island, it was the home of William Henry Pope, Father of Confederation. The house stands on the two-hectare remains of what was once a much larger estate which today includes the picturesque house, a small barn/ carriage house, and a garden.

The heritage value of Ardgowan National Historic Site lies in its association with William Henry Pope at the time of Confederation. This is embodied in the picturesque features of the property reminiscent of that time B the early cottage ornée residence in its garden setting. Ardgowan was the home of William Henry Pope from 1854-1873. The once-substantial estate on the outskirts of Charlottetown is the only surviving residence occupied by an Island Father of Confederation during the Charlottetown Conference. The Popes billetted George Brown and hosted a luncheon for delegates here during the September 1864 conference. While much of the Confederation-era house remains, subsequent owners have added bay windows to the facade as well as making many additions to the rear. Parks Canada acquired Ardgowan in 1967, rehabilitated it in 1980-82 for office use, then added an east wing and single central section in 1994.

©Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 1990
Charlottetown City Hall National Historic Site of Canada
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island

The Charlottetown City Hall is a three-storey, Romanesque Revival-style, red brick building erected in 1888. It is located in Charlottetown's historic downtown district.

The Charlottetown City Hall was designated a national historic site in 1984 because its grand scale and elegant design in the Romanesque Revival style symbolize the pride and confidence felt by the city during the late 19th century.

The commanding presence and elegant design of the Charlottetown City Hall reflect the city's late-19th century period of growth and prosperity and its status as the provincial capital. Designed by architects Phillips and Chappell, it is typical of civic buildings built during the second half of the 19th century in its use of an ornate, Victorian version of the Romanesque Revival style. Its multi-functional plan, typical of town and city halls of the period, included a police station, fire hall and stable on the ground floor, and council chambers, a court room, and offices on the upper storeys. It was constructed in 1888 by builder W.H Fraser.

©Frank MacKinnon, Honour the Founders! Enjoy the Arts!, Fathers of Confederation Buildings Trust, Charlottetown, 1990, p.67
Confederation Centre of the Arts National Historic Site of Canada
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island

Occupying an entire block, the Confederation Centre of the Arts faces Queen's Square in Charlottetown's business district. Built in 1963-1964, the Centre is a large, multi-purpose cultural complex executed in the modern Brutalist style. Its four constituent pavilions are distinct yet form a coherent whole and contain a theatre, art gallery and public library clustered in a U-shape around the "Memorial Hall." It sits adjacent to Province House, the legislature building for Prince Edward Island.

The Confederation Centre of the Arts was built with the intent to inspire Canadians, through heritage and the arts, to celebrate the origins and development of Canada as a nation. The centre was constructed between 1963 and 1965 in the modern Brutalist style to the designs of architect Dimitri Dimakopoulos, theatre designer George Izenour, and sculptor Gérard Tremblay. David L. Klepper and Russell Johnson de Bolt of Berenak and Newman Inc. were the acoustic consultants, while William M. C. Lam designed the lighting.

©Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada
Dalvay-by-the-Sea National Historic Site of Canada
York, Prince Edward Island

Queen Anne Revival summer home, 1896-99.

Dalvay-by-the-Sea is a summer residence built in the late-19th century in the Queen Anne Revival Style. It is located at the east end of Prince Edward Island National Park, about 180 metres from the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

Dalvay-by-the-Sea was designated a national historic site because it is of national architectural significance as a fine domestic example of the Queen Anne Revival Style in Canadian architecture.

Dalvay was built as a summer residence for Alexander McDonald, president of Standard Oil of Kentucky. The spacious grounds and picturesque setting reinforce the Queen Anne Revival style of the house and reflect the building's original use as a summer home.

©Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 2006
Dundas Terrace National Historic Site of Canada
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island

Dundas Terrace is a three-and-a-half-storey, Queen Anne Revival style apartment building built in the late 19th century. It is located on Water Street in downtown Charlottetown.

Dundas Terrace was designated a national historic site because it is a particularly good example of the Queen Anne Revival style as expressed in apartment architecture.

The heritage value of Dundas Terrace resides in its expression of the Queen Anne Revival style in a wooden apartment building in the Maritimes. Designed by W.C. Harris to serve as an apartment building, its exterior design evokes the unity of a single family dwelling. It is an early example of a purpose-built apartment building and a rare example of an apartment building constructed in wood.

©Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 2006
Fairholm National Historic Site of Canada
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island

Fairholm is an early-19th century, brick villa with a former carriage house, located on a large, rectangular property in the city of Charlottetown.

Fairholm was designated a national historic site in 1992 because it is a fine and rare surviving example of a Picturesque villa in Atlantic Canada.

Fairholm exemplifies the Picturesque villa as it was interpreted in Atlantic Canada, where the Picturesque aesthetic retained the stately classicism popular in the Maritime provinces. Built for politician and administrator T.H. Haviland Sr. (1795-1867), it is a rare example of early brick construction both on Prince Edward Island and within the Picturesque villa inventory. The spacious grounds reinforce the Picturesque qualities of the villa. A late-19th-century carriage house helps complete the villa landscape.

©Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada
Farmers' Bank of Rustico National Historic Site of Canada
Rustico, Prince Edward Island

Located in the small hamlet of Rustico on Prince Edward Island, the Farmers' Bank of South Rustico National Historic Site of Canada is a modestly sized, ruggedly simple, stone building in the British classical tradition. Seven bays wide, with two-and-a-half storeys, the bank stands adjacent to a church and alongside a road to the water's edge. The building is now operated as a museum.

The Farmers' Bank of Rustico was designated a national historic site of Canada in 1959 because, under the leadership of the parish priest Georges Antoine Belcourt, this building was erected to house one of the first people's banks in Canada.

The Farmers' Bank of Rustico illustrates an important stage in the evolution of co-operative banking in the 19th century in Canada. Father G. A. Belcourt led the parishioners who constructed the bank building between 1861 and 1863. Chartered in 1864, and directed by farmers and fishermen, it operated until 1894, and heralded the development of the credit union movement. The bank provided cheap credit and small loans allowing members of this predominantly Acadian farming community to purchase lands, make improvements, and gain economic independence.

©Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 1982
Former Summerside Post Office National Historic Site of Canada
Summerside, Prince Edward Island

The Former Summerside Post Office is a two-and-a-half-storey, brick building constructed between 1883 and 1887.

The Former Summerside Post Office was designated a national historic site because: it is representative of small urban post offices designed by Thomas Fuller; it possesses architectural merit, this is to say it has not undergone major exterior alteration; and it possesses integrity, that is to say that its siting is sympathetic.

The Former Summerside Post Office is a good example of the post offices erected by the Department of Public Works in smaller urban centres during Thomas Fuller's term as Chief Architect (1881-1886). It is representative of Fuller post offices in its two-and-a-half-storey height, its use of high-quality materials, its blend of Gothic and Romanesque elements, and its prominent siting on a corner lot.

©Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 1989
Government House National Historic Site of Canada
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island

Government House National Historic Site of Canada, located west of the historic area of Charlottetown, faces the harbour where Pond Road joins the waterfront roadway to Victoria Park. Serving as the home for the Prince Edward Island Lieutenant Governor, the house sits on an extensive property known as Fanning Bank. This large, graceful, early 19th-century neoclassical two-storey residence features a double-height gabled portico flanked by verandahs, while the exterior is clad in wood shingles.

The heritage value of Government House resides in its symbolic and functional role as an official residence, and in its neoclassical architecture. As the official residence of the Lieutenant Governor of Prince Edward Island, Government House has provided a setting of simple elegance for the formal entertainment of the Island community and its distinguished visitors. Several alterations have occurred since the residence was built in 1835 by the contractors, Isaac Smith, Henry Smith and Nathan Wright. Its landscape includes estate grounds with outbuildings.

©Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 1990
Great George Street Historic District National Historic Site of Canada
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island

Great George Street Historic District National Historic Site of Canada consists of a wide street, six blocks long, in the heart of Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. The site begins at the waterfront and extends north along Great George Street to include Province House National Historic Site of Canada. Ascending gently from Peake's Quay, the street is lined with buildings of various domestic architectural styles and functions, but since the buildings are all of similar scale and setback, the street offers a harmonious and coherent viewscape.

On August 31st and September 1st 1864, the Fathers of Confederation arrived at Peake's Quay Charlottetown to attend the Charlottetown Conference. The event was hosted at Province House, the historic seat of Island government, which sits at the end of Great George Street. The discussions at this conference resulted in the confederation of four provinces of British North America into the Dominion of Canada on July 1, 1867 in Québec. Since 1864, Great George Street has retained its original colonial plan, its close association with the water, and its regular ascent to the central square and seat of government at Province House. In fact, the view up Great George Street from Peake's Quay contains many elements that the Fathers of Confederation would have experienced on their way to the Charlottetown Conference in 1864. These elements, including various buildings from the period, are designed predominantly in the British classical style.

Great George Street has evolved architecturally while preserving spatial arrangements and structures that are typical of the successive stages of its history. While the street remains anchored to the Confederation Era with roughly one-half of its buildings dating from that period, the surviving later buildings testify to the evolution of the streetscape over time. Through their variety of stylistic and functional types, the richness of domestic architecture on Great George Street speaks to facets of economic, political and social life experienced by many Canadians as the young country matured in the post-Confederation era. The evolution of architectural styles displayed on this street, including British classical, Neoclassical, Italianate, Queen Anne Revival, and Gothic Revival, is remarkably harmonious due to general overriding similarities in scale and setback that provide the street with an overall coherence.

©Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada
Jean-Pierre Roma at Three Rivers National Historic Site of Canada
Brudenell, Prince Edward Island

Jean-Pierre Roma at Three Rivers National Historic Site of Canada is situated at the tip of Brudenell Point, on the eastern shore of Prince Edward Island. The site comprises remains of the 18th-century Roma settlement, the remains of unidentified 19th-century buildings, and the remains of the 19th-century Macdonald commercial establishment.

In 1732, Jean-Pierre Roma established a French fishing and trading settlement that included nine substantial buildings and gardens. The settlement survived until 1745 when New Englanders destroyed it after the siege of Louisbourg. Following the cession of the island to Great Britain, Brudenell Point was uninhabited until early in the 19th century. It was owned by absentee landlords, who leased it to different individuals, principally the Macdonalds, who operated a commercial and boat building business on the point.

©Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 1987
Kensington Railway Station (Prince Edward Island) National Historic Site of Canada
Kensington, Prince Edward Island

Kensington Railway Station National Historic Site of Canada is a picturesque fieldstone building with a high gable roof and sheltered platforms at each of its gable ends. For almost a century, it was the passenger station at the town of Kensington for the Prince Edward Island Railway. In 1999 the station was conserved as the centre-piece of the former railyards, now rehabilitated as a tourist venue.

Kensington Railway Station National Historic Site of Canada was designed by Prince Edward Island architect Charles Chappell and built in 1904-1905 by local construction company M.F. Schurman for the Prince Edward Island Railway. The railway had been in operation since 1871 with a 147 mile line that extended from Georgetown to Alberton. This station replaced an earlier frame station in Kensington and was built to accommodate passenger traffic, freight facilities being housed in a separate building to the north. Passenger traffic was suspended in Prince Edward Island in 1969 and the Town of Kensington purchased the station in 1985 with the intent of restoring it for public use.

©Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada


©Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada
L.M. Montgomery's Cavendish National Historic Site of Canada
Cavendish, Prince Edward Island

Intimately associated with Lucy Maud Montgomery's formative years and early productive career.

Green Gables Heritage Place is famous around the world as the inspiration for the setting in Lucy Maud Montgomery's classic tale of fiction, Anne of Green Gables. Designated in 2004, L. M. Montgomery's Cavendish National Historic Site includes the Site of Lucy Maud Montgomery's Cavendish Home and Green Gables Heritage Place.

L.M. Montgomery's Cavendish National Historic Site is a cultural landscape that embraces the landscape near Cavendish, Prince Edward Island, that author L. M. Montgomery knew so well and made famous in her "Anne of Green Gables" books. The designated area includes the Green Gables house, Montgomery's Cavendish home, and several landscape features such as the Haunted Wood Trail, Balsam Hollow Trail and Lover's Lane, dear to Montgomery and familiar to her readers.

L.M. Montgomery's Cavendish National Historic Site embraces two segments of a cultural landscape intimately associated with the author: one is the farm of Montgomery's maternal grandparents where she lived for the first 37 years of her life. This farmscape incorporates the ruins of the house and farm buildings that existed in Montgomery's time, as well as the wooded groves and pathways described in her stories. The second area encompasses Green Gables, the neighbouring farmstead which features in Montgomery's most famous novel, "Anne of Green Gables" published in 1908, and includes the house in its natural setting with surroundings that inspired both her imagination and her fiction including the Haunted Wood Trail, the schoolhouse, Lover's Lane, the Balsam Hollow Trail and the babbling brook. Together these landscapes evoke both Montgomery's real life and the fictional world she created.

The heritage value of L.M. Montgomery's Cavendish National Historic Site resides in its evocation of L.M. Montgomery's world — both real and imaginary — at the time of her most famous accomplishments. Its value lies in the physical properties of these two landscapes that both inspired Montgomery's fiction, and give her fictional world a basis in reality. They include the sites and settings, buildings and landscape features that provided a backdrop for both Montgomery's life and her literary work.

Green Gables House sits in the midst of Prince Edward Island National Park of Canada. A warm and welcoming residence, the one-and-a-half storey house is painted white and topped by the famous green-gable roof. Its front façade is highlighted by a dormer window, a small vestibule entrance, and green shutters that flank the double pane, wood, sash windows.

Green Gables House is a Recognized Federal Heritage Building because of its historical associations, and its architectural and environmental value.

Green Gables House is internationally famous as one of Canada's most celebrated fictional houses. It is one of the best examples of a building associated with the Canadian author, Lucy Maud Montgomery, who used the farmhouse as both the inspiration and the setting for her famous novel, "Anne of Green Gables." The story was an instant success in 1908 and has since been translated into 17 languages. Green Gables House has been of interest to tourists since the publication of the novel, and has played an important role in the interpretive programs of Prince Edward Island National Park of Canada.

Green Gables House is valued for its good aesthetic and functional design. Its farmhouse design, built in successive stages, places it firmly in Canadian vernacular building traditions of the 19th century. It is of a type very common in Prince Edward Island and most of eastern Canada. The interior of the house has since been reconstructed to appear as it did in the novels.

©Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 2003
Port-la-Joye—Fort Amherst National Historic Site of Canada
Rocky Point, Prince Edward Island

Remains of British and French forts.

Port-la-Joye—Fort Amherst National Historic Site of Canada commemorates the first permanent European settlement on Prince Edward Island. Grassy ruins of the British fort are still visible, and interpretive displays give visitors an appreciation of the site's history. The grounds provide an excellent view of the countryside and the Charlottetown Harbour.

Port-la-Joye—Fort Amherst National Historic Site of Canada is a remnant 18th-century fort built by the French and later occupied by the British. Situated on the west side of the channel entrance to Charlottetown harbour, it is a landscape of gently rolling hills with remnants of a fort earthworks, of an early settler's house, of at least three other French / Acadian farms, and of the French garrison, as well as 19th- and 20th-century facilities.

The heritage value of the site resides in its historical associations as illustrated by the site, setting and remnants of the fort and evidence of French and British military occupancy as well as early Acadian settlement. Port-la-Joye was established as headquarters for the French protection, trade and administration of Ile-St.-Jean in 1720. Despite being abandoned and captured by the British several times between 1720 and 1758, Acadians established farms in the surrounding area, and the French built a Vauban-style star-shaped fort in 1748-1758. A former farm belonging to Michel Haché-Gallant is still visible. After the British added a rectangular earthwork in front of the fort and called it Fort Amherst, it remained the major administrative centre for Prince Edward Island until 1770.

©Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 2012
Prince Edward Island National Park of Canada
Headquarters: Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island

A protected area with spectacular coast.

Prince Edward Island National Park is home to sand dunes, barrier islands and sandspits, beaches, sandstone cliffs, wetlands and forests. The park also features unique cultural resources, notably Green Gables, part of L. M. Montgomery's Cavendish National Historic Site, and Dalvay-by-the-Sea National Historic Site.

©Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 1987
Province House National Historic Site of Canada
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island

Neoclassical birthplace of Confederation.

The birthplace of Confederation and the seat of Prince Edward Island's provincial legislature since 1847, Province House National Historic Site stands as a landmark in Charlottetown. Visitors can learn about the history of the site and the current Legislative Assembly through guided tours, displays and an audio-visual presentation.

Province House National Historic Site of Canada is a large public building in the Neoclassical style which is situated in the centre of Charlottetown on Great George Street. It is the dominant feature of Queen Square and a landmark in the Great George Street Historic District.

The heritage value of this site resides in its historical associations with Canadian Confederation and with the judicial system in Prince Edward Island as well as in its illustration of the Neoclassical style of architecture.

Province House was designed in 1839 by the premier Prince Edward Island architect/ builder of the period, Isaac Smith. It was completed for initiation as Prince Edward Island's legislature on the 26 January, 1847. The main purpose of the building was to house a Legislative Assembly, found on the second storey. Province House also contains a Legislative Council on the second storey where the delegates to the Charlottetown Conference held their meetings in September 1864. From 1847 to 1872, Province House included space on the ground floor to accommodate the supreme court and judicial offices for the province of Prince Edward Island. Province House is owned by the Prince Edward Island government.

Queen Square is Charlottetown's central square, set aside in the original layout of the town for administrative and church buildings. Province House occupies the central position in Queen Square framing Great George Street with a view of the waterfront.

The Confederation Chamber was refurbished to reflect its historical importance in 1920 and again from 1974-1983. At this time, the exterior of the building was returned to its 1850 condition, while the legislative council chamber (Confederation Chamber), library, and a series of administrative offices were restored to the 1864 period. The supreme court chamber on the ground floor was also returned to its original size.

©Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 2007
Shaw's Hotel National Historic Site of Canada
Brackley Beach, Prince Edward Island

Shaw's Hotel National Historic Site of Canada is a resort complex located on 8 hectares (20 acres) of land at Brackley Beach on the north shore of Prince Edward Island. It consists of a two-and-a-half-storey main lodge, two large barns, a laundry facility and twenty-five cottages connected by a dirt road in the midst of cultivated fields.

Shaw's Hotel originated when the Shaw family built a new farmhouse on their Brackley Beach property in 1860 and decided to take paying guests. Since that time the farmhouse has been expanded to create today's main lodge through the addition of a four-bay mansard-roofed extension (late 19th century), its extension by two bays (early 20th century) and the addition of a dining room on its south side (1960s). Twenty-five guest cottages were also built on the resort over the years (1896-2000). The hotel was once linked to the Shaw's large farm which ceased operation in the 1970s, although 2 of the large barns (1943 and 1944) survive as storage facilities. The fields continue to be worked by farmers who rent them.

The heritage value of Shaw's Hotel resides in its location on the north shore of Prince Edward Island, its agricultural roots, and its identity as a modest family resort that has evolved over almost 150 years. Value lies in the recreational and agricultural ambience of the cultural landscape, its varied informal composition and evolution, and its peaceful rural setting.

©Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 1999
St. Dunstan's Roman Catholic Cathedral / Basilica National Historic Site of Canada
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island

St. Dunstan's Roman Catholic Cathedral National Historic Site of Canada is a large, stone church in the centre of Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. Set on the lawns of a well-treed ecclesiastical precinct next to a large stone bishop's palace, its imposing bulk, masonry construction, and Gothic Revival style towers, pinnacles, and triple portal facade create an imposing presence on Great George Street.

St. Dunstan's Roman Catholic Cathedral was designated a national historic site of Canada because it is a fine representative example of the High Victorian Gothic Revival style of architecture.

Designed and built in the French-inspired interpretation of the High Victorian Gothic Revival style by Quebec architect Francois-Xavier Berlinguet in 1896-1907, the cathedral suffered extensive fire damage in 1913 after which its interior was substantially redesigned and rebuilt in a more English-inspired idiom by architect J. M Hunter. St. Dunstan's is the centre of the Roman Catholic church in Prince Edward Island and the mother church of the diocese. It was consecrated and elevated to the status of Basilica in 1929.

©Strathgartney Foundation / La fondation Strathgartney, ca. 1960
Strathgartney Homestead National Historic Site of Canada
Bonshaw, Prince Edward Island

Strathgartney Homestead National Historic Site of Canada is a 32-acre (12.9 ha) remnant of the 500-acre (202.3 ha) estate of Robert Bruce Stewart, a nineteenth-century landowner. It contains the Stewart house, a carriage house and a collection of seven farm outbuildings from the Stewart period set in an agricultural landscape.

The heritage value of this site resides in the buildings and landscape that constitute the Strathgartney Homestead as remnant survivals, symbolic of the role of the Stewart family in the land tenure history of the island and their ability to illustrate the lifestyle of the Stewart family.

The Strathgartney estate was constructed by Robert Bruce Stewart in the early 1860s and run by his family until 1876 when they left in response to the 1875 approval of the Land Purchase Act. The homestead has been much changed since that time.

©Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, J. Butterill, 1995
Tryon United Church National Historic Site of Canada
Tryon, Prince Edward Island

Tryon United Church National Historic Site of Canada is a wooden church in the High Victorian Gothic Revival style, located in the small rural community of Tryon, on the banks of the Tryon River, along Prince Edward Island's south western shore. A church hall was added to the side of the church in recent times.

Built in 1881 for a Methodist congregation, Tryon United Church was designed by William Critchlow Harris, one of Prince Edward Island's most distinguished architects. Its simple, bold form, picturesque tower, and limited Gothic detailing are typical of the interpretation of the High Victorian Gothic Revival style for small parish churches in Canada. This eclectic style gave designers greater freedom than the more historically correct ecclesiological Gothic Revival phase that had preceded it.

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Last Updated: 06-Nov-2014